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StatsCan Releases 'Waste management industry: Business and government sectors, 2008' Report

Date December 22, 2010 Author Jason Smith Categories Industry News
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Waste management industry: Business and government sectors, 2008
 
Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Wednesday, December 22, 2010
 
The waste management industry in Canada handled just over 34 million metric tonnes of waste in 2008. This amount translates into approximately 1,031 kilograms of waste per Canadian. Of this total, the quantity of waste sent to public and private waste disposal facilities was 25.9 million metric tonnes, practically unchanged since 2006.
 
The remaining 8.5 million metric tonnes was sent for recycling or composting, up 9.7% from 2006.
 
About one-third of waste for disposal came from residential sources, while the other two thirds came from non-residential sources.
 
The amount of residential waste disposal fell by 4.0% to 8.5 million metric tonnes in 2008. Meanwhile, the amount of non-residential waste rose by 1.8% the same year, at 17.3 million metric tonnes.
 
The quantity of waste sent for disposal fell in most provinces
 
Between 2006 and 2008, the quantity of waste sent for disposal increased in three provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.
 
Saskatchewan saw the biggest increase in the amount of waste disposal, with an 8.3% change from 2006 to 2008. On the other hand, New Brunswick had the biggest decrease in the quantity of waste disposed, with a 6.3% decline.
 
On a per capita basis, Alberta sent the most waste for disposal in 2008 - the equivalent of just over 1.1 metric tonnes per person. Conversely, Nova Scotia sent only 378 kilograms per person for disposal. The high per capita disposal rates in Alberta were largely the result of non-residential waste disposal. In terms of residential waste, per capita disposal in Alberta was close to the national average.
 
Waste diversion: Largest increase in electronics
 
Nationally, the quantity of materials diverted from disposal for recycling or composting increased by about 10% from 2006 to 2008. Electronic waste recycling saw the biggest increase (115%). This was followed by plastic materials, which rose by 40%.
 
Local governments spending more on waste management
 
Local governments spent approximately $2.6 billion on waste management in 2008, up from $2.1 billion two years earlier.
 
Provincially, municipalities that spent more money per capita on waste management reported diverting greater amounts of waste per person.
 
Business sector operating revenues rose 13% to $5.8 billion between 2006 and 2008. Operating expenditures incurred by waste management firms increased 19% to $5.1 billion.
 
Just over 31,000 people were employed full-time in the waste management industry in both the government and business sectors in 2008.
 
Note to readers
This release is based on the results of the biennial report on the Canadian waste management industry entitled Waste Management Industry Survey: Business and Government Sectors 2008.
This analysis, based on data from the Waste Management Industry Survey, examines the quantities of waste disposed of in landfills and incinerators managed by governments and waste management firms, as well as the amount of waste diverted. It also includes information on the preparation of materials for recycling or composting and statistics on the financial and employment characteristics of local governments and firms that provided waste management services.
-- 
Andrew Reeves
Outreach & Communications Coordinator
Recycling Council of Ontario
(416) 657-2797, ext. 1
andrew@rco.on.ca
 

Released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time in The Daily, Wednesday, December 22, 2010

The quantity of waste sent for disposal fell in most provinces

Between 2006 and 2008, the quantity of waste sent for disposal increased in three provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.

Saskatchewan saw the biggest increase in the amount of waste disposal, with an 8.3% change from 2006 to 2008. On the other hand, New Brunswick had the biggest decrease in the quantity of waste disposed, with a 6.3% decline.

On a per capita basis, Alberta sent the most waste for disposal in 2008 - the equivalent of just over 1.1 metric tonnes per person. Conversely, Nova Scotia sent only 378 kilograms per person for disposal. The high per capita disposal rates in Alberta were largely the result of non-residential waste disposal. In terms of residential waste, per capita disposal in Alberta was close to the national average.

Waste diversion: Largest increase in electronics

Nationally, the quantity of materials diverted from disposal for recycling or composting increased by about 10% from 2006 to 2008. Electronic waste recycling saw the biggest increase (115%). This was followed by plastic materials, which rose by 40%.

Local governments spending more on waste management

Local governments spent approximately $2.6 billion on waste management in 2008, up from $2.1 billion two years earlier.

Provincially, municipalities that spent more money per capita on waste management reported diverting greater amounts of waste per person.

Business sector operating revenues rose 13% to $5.8 billion between 2006 and 2008. Operating expenditures incurred by waste management firms increased 19% to $5.1 billion.

Just over 31,000 people were employed full-time in the waste management industry in both the government and business sectors in 2008.

Note to readers

This release is based on the results of the biennial report on the Canadian waste management industry entitled Waste Management Industry Survey: Business and Government Sectors 2008.

This analysis, based on data from the Waste Management Industry Survey, examines the quantities of waste disposed of in landfills and incinerators managed by governments and waste management firms, as well as the amount of waste diverted. It also includes information on the preparation of materials for recycling or composting and statistics on the financial and employment characteristics of local governments and firms that provided waste management services.

To download the report, please visit the StatsCan website. [PDF format]

 

 

 

 

                              

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